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MEMS 2017 Conference Best Paper Award Winners!

The Lin Lab and M3B Program are proud to announce that the project entitled "3D Printed, Three-Flow Microfluidic Concentration Gradient Generator for E.Coli-Antibiotic Drug Screening" won the Best Student Paper Award at The 30th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS 2017) in Las Vegas, NV (January 22-26, 2017)!

Microfluidics via Additive Manufacturing

The M3B Program - a division of the Liwei Lin Lab - performs various cutting-edge microfluidics research at the confluence of mechanical and biological engineering for biomedical applications. Our research primarily entails the exploration of 3D printing as an alternative (and advantageous) manufacturing method for microfluidic devices.

Carbon nanotube (CNT) forests were grown directly on a silicon substrate using a Fe/Al/Mo stacking layer which functioned as both the catalyst material and subsequently a conductive current collecting layer in pseudocapacitor applications.

Energy Storage and Harvesting

Carbon nanotube (CNT) forests were grown directly on a silicon substrate using a Fe/Al/Mo stacking layer which functioned as both the catalyst material and subsequently a conductive current collecting layer in pseudocapacitor applications...

Micro/Nanoengineered Platforms for Cell Mechanobiology

Microenvironmental mechanical cues influence diverse cellular processes, such as cell migration, cell morphology, and stem cell fate decisions. In our lab, we use mechanical engineering methods and micro/nanofabrication processes to create novel technologies at scales that are biologically relevant and advantageous for studying and controlling cellular functions.

Autonomous Microfluidic Components, Circuits and Systems

Similar to the way in which integrated circuits (ICs) revolutionized electronics, the advent of integrated microfluidic circuitry could significantly impact both chemical and biological fields. Here we utilize fluidic techniques routed in mechanical engineering to develop next-generation microfluidic components and systems that are capable of autonomous “on-chip” functionalities.